Acadia National Park

When thinking of national parks, you often think of the extreme eastern part of the United States, but one of the most spectacular national parks in the nation is Acadia National Park.

Plan your Visit to
Acadia National Park

The First Eastern National Park

It is the first eastern state park in existence and is a very serene environment to visit. Although the environment may be serene, the activities are quite entertaining.

When to Go

April – May – June – July – August – September – October

Activities

Horseback Riding – Swimming – Beach – Family – Hiking – Fishing – Leaf-Peeping – Scenic Drives – Biking – Bird-Watching – Wild flowers – Winter Sports – Boating – Climbing – Stunning Vistas – Wildlife

Camping

Camping in some parts of the United States means that you may encounter some very extreme weather conditions. Desert climates and even bitter cold can be found in many national parks, but Acadia National Park offers visitors the ability to camp in an environment that is more inviting than many others. The cool air whistles through the trees as you enjoy Blackwoods Campground or get closer to the water within Seawall Campground. Although there are many campgrounds throughout Acadia National Park there is definitely no shortage of beauty, so no matter which one you choose you are sure to have an amazing experience. It is recommended that you make a reservation to ensure that you get a spot within a campground.

Hiking

One of the best aspects of any national park is the ability to hike through the trails that are found throughout. Acadia National Park is truly no different. There are hundreds of miles of trails that range from very easy to navigate, to quite difficult and recommended for advanced hikers. Some things to consider when you are looking to go on a hike through Acadia National Park is the fact that it is a protected environment so be sure to pick up after yourself. Have a no trace left behind mentality when hiking through the trails of the park. Also, make sure you have an ample water supply. The days can get quite hot and water is always your friend.

Bird Watching

Birds can be found throughout North America, but some regions of the country attract specific species of birds. Acadia National Forest is home to many different birds and even if you are not very educated in bird species you can get a list of the species to look for at the front entrance of the park. The list will also contain specific areas that birds tend to stay around. Some of these places includes Otter Point, Precipice, and Beaver Dam Pond. Mid-April through August is the best time to see the birds that call Acadia National Forest home.

Take A Guided Tour

It is a great idea to venture out on your own throughout Acadia National Park. It allows you to look at the park from your own perspective, but there are times where you may want to know more about what you are looking at and a guided tour can give you the education you desire. Guided tours come in the form of bus tours, carriage tours, and the highly popular walking tour. Guides know the ins and outs of Acadia National Park and they can answer any and all of your questions throughout the tour. They also know the best places to see the wildlife where you can take home more memories than just of the trees and landscapes.

Ranger Narrated Boat Cruises

If you want to earn your sea legs while in Acadia National Park, a ranger narrated boat cruise will be right for you. These cruses call for participants to wear waterproof and also windproof clothing. The air off the water is quite a bit cooler than off the land, so you will want to stay warm and dry. It is additionally recommended that you bring along snacks during the tour to keep you from getting hungry and sunglasses to shield your eyes from the glare from the water. There are three cruises to choose from. Baker Island Cruise, Frenchman Bay Cruise, and Islesford Historical Cruise. These cruises run at different times throughout the year and book up fast so make reservations early to avoid any disappointments.

Things to Know

The fees for entrance to Acadia National Park are dependent upon how you plan on traveling around the park and are for a 7-consecutive day period of time. The fees are $25 for a private vehicle, $20 for a motorcycle, and $12 for non-motorized sources of travel. For an annual pass into the park you can get the maximum number of visits for just $50. There is an ongoing traffic congestion issue throughout Acadia National Park and therefore there are plans on alleviating the traffic within the park, so during your visit you may have to park outside the park and be bussed in for these purposes. The park is beautiful no matter how you arrive and you are sure to enjoy yourself throughout your visit. Take a trip to the eastern most national park and enjoy Acadia National Park for all its natural untouched atmosphere.


Download a Acadia National Park Map

Planning a Acadia National Park? Be sure to download the official Acadia National Park map, below, or use our interactive maps to find restaurants, hotels, or activities along the route of your choosing in and around the park. Either way, don’t leave home without a map of Acadia National Park. This free Acadia National Park map shows park roads, attractions, and more.


Average High/Low Temperatures
JanFebMarAprMayJune
32/1433/1541/2552/3364/4272/51
JulAugSeptOctNovDec
77/5776/5668/4958/4148/3337/19

Official Acadia National Park Map – Click on the Map to download 

Acadia National Park 1 Acadia National Park